Year
Medea
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Introduction

"Medea” (Gr: “Medeia”) is a tragedy written by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides, based on the myth of Jason and Medea, and particularly Medea’s revenge against Jason for betraying her with another woman. Often considered Euripides’ best and most popular work and one of the great plays of the Western canon, it only won third prize when it was presented at the Dionysia festival in 431 BCE, along with the lost plays “Philoctetes”, “Dictys” and “Theristai”. (Maslin, 2009).

Analysis

Medea Sarcophagus

Harris, B. & Zucker, S. (2012). Medea Sarcophagus, 140 - 150 C.E. Retrieved June 22, 2015, from Khan Academy: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ancient-art-civilizations/roman/middle-empire/v/medea-sarcophagus-140-150-c-e

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